Monday, April 16, 2012

The Rule of Three in Discworld

Perhaps you have heard of the 'Rule of Three' in comedy writing. For those that haven't, I point you to a really down-and-dirty quick definition/explantion by John Kinde:

"The first two items in the triplet set the pattern (the "straight" line) and the third item breaks the pattern (the curve/the twist/the derailment). Breaking the pattern heightens the tension and creates the surprise, usually resulting in laughter."

He's got a more detailed explanation here.

But I've found that it's always good to have masterful examples - all the better to illustrate. And who could be better or teach more about the rule of three than Terry Pratchett? His books are riddled with countless examples.

Example 1:
In Going Postal, Pratchett opens with a "The Nine-Thousand-Year Prologue." He describes ships and wreckage floating on rivers beneath the ocean's surface - which is quite whimsical to begin with.

Then you come across this line: "Some stricken ships have rigging; some even have sails. Many still have crew, tangled in the rigging or lashed to the wheel."

(Yes, the 'ew' factor makes it funny too.)

But you have set-up: "Some stricken ships have rigging;"
You have the continuing line : "some even have sails"
You have the derailment: "Many still have crew, tangled in the rigging or lashed to the wheel."

That's on the second page.

Example 2:
Also in Going Postal:
The scene - Moist is about to be hanged in front of a large crowd. Pratchett tells us: "There was a stir when they climbed up into the chilly morning air, followed by a few boos and even some applause."

Set-up: "People were strange like that."
The continuing line: "Steal five dollars and you were a petty thief."
The derailment: "Steal thousands of dollars and you were either a government or a hero."

Your assignment, should you choose to accept it, is to write your own funny 'triplet.' You can have a second or two to set your stage, but after that we've gotta be able to see the set up, the continuing line, and then surprise us with your derailment.

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